My next self-funded business hit $160,000 in revenue in its first year alone. After that first taste of self-made success, I’ve gone on to sign consulting contracts worth tens of thousands of dollars with startups like LinkedIn and Google, launch profitable online courses, and build a following of hundreds of thousands for this blog and my podcast series.
Clearly, there's a lot of demand on Amazon, and if any product is going to sell, it's going to sell well on Amazon. But the goal here is to source the right products that will easily sell at the world's largest online retailer. Generally, products between $10 and $50 sell very well here. Just be sure to do the right market research before jumping on this bandwagon.
Starting a podcast, like making a YouTube channel or blog, comes down to telling interesting stories and building an engaged audience. I’m probably sounding like a broken record by now, but you need a niche that you’re interested in and there’s already a demand for. Come up with a list of topics you’d like to talk about and then search iTunes charts, Google Trends and other podcast research sites like cast.market to see what’s currently out there and popular.

Inkd is a site for professional-quality materials — business cards, brochures, letterheads and envelopes all feature on the site. An account is free to create, and the Inkd team has to approve your design before it is available to sell. The designer gets 20 percent of the total retail sale, minus tax. Right now, there’s no exclusivity limitation, but in the future an exclusive option will become available, netting designers a better share of the revenue. Most products on Inkd run around $30, so a design would only net designers around $6 per sale.

 Sarah Vermunt is a career and entrepreneur coach, and the Founder of Toronto-based Careergasm. She teaches at the School of Business and Economics at Wilfrid Laurier University. Sarah is a PhD Candidate in Organizational Behaviour and Human Resources Management, and has a Master’s degree in Leadership Studies. She studied executive management coaching at the graduate level, and life coaching under Dr. Martha Beck, Harvard-educated coaching expert of O Magazine and the Oprah Winfrey Show. Follow Sarah at www.careergasm.com, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter @careergasm.
Are you a professional in a field that can help answer questions for people looking for your expertise? Websites like JustAnswer and LivePerson match you up with people looking for answers to technical or professional questions. You can make money online by simply answering these questions and providing the right information to people based on their individualistic circumstances.
The final way to make money on a blog is through pay-per-click advertising, such as Google Adsense. Personally I don’t recommend pay-per-click for bloggers who want to build a loyal following. The amount you can earn from it is very small unless your blog gets enormous amounts of traffic, and the value to your readers is negligible. For more on why Adsense sucks, (and a load of other inspirational advice) read Chris Guillebeau’s free manifesto, 279 days to overnight success.
WebEmployed.com is a blog aimed to provide information and resources to people who want to make money online by doing online jobs. The blog shares legitimate sources and companies that allow people to join them and work from home. The true inspiration of our website is the people who are trying to earn a stable income but can’t find good jobs because of bad economic conditions and other factors. We have sorted the sources into different categories based on different skill areas. We publish step-by-step guides about those sources to help the readers become familiar with their working structure. We also encourage the readers to contact us directly through our ‘Contact Us’ page in case they need further help with our guides.
You can also create tees, either with your designs or the designs of others. I created a simple t-shirt that cost $14.20, then added a design for $4.50, so the cost to make the shirt was $18.70. At that point, you tack on your commission — whatever amount you'd like based on your design and what you think you can earn. I would stick around the same pricing as the other sites to stay competitive, so I chose a commission of $4.00 per shirt, bringing the selling price up to $22.70. Selling 50 shirts would net me a profit of 200 dollars.

I’ve been reading and following up on several of your blog / emails – your work is consistently thorough. I second MyfrogTee’s June 5th 2017 suggestion of updating this article. For instance, I’ve seen grumblings about CafePress too (mentioned here in replies); and the pinkytee.com site seems stale – nothing on the home page, and the last news post is dated December 26, 2016 … as Benny Hsu efforts clearly shows, it takes a good number of failures before making it. That’s certainly true for internet businesses as well. 
×