My next self-funded business hit $160,000 in revenue in its first year alone. After that first taste of self-made success, I’ve gone on to sign consulting contracts worth tens of thousands of dollars with startups like LinkedIn and Google, launch profitable online courses, and build a following of hundreds of thousands for this blog and my podcast series.
Now, making money online should seem like a pleasurable activity. Why wouldn't we do just about anything to see things through, since it would be a major source of pleasure, right? Wrong. In the beginning, like anything else, we might get really excited about it. We might also set our hopes very high. But that all comes crashing down when we begin to fail.
I go to a local life drawing session most weekends and they are always looking for new models. And a lot of the models are also artists. When they’re not modelling, they’re sitting in front of the model drawing with the rest of us! I think the models there get £30 for a two hour session, so the money is not bad. You may get more if you already have some experience.
This is the oldest website monetization trick in the book and plenty of dating sites still choose affiliate networks as part of their overall strategy. In most cases, the CPA (cost per action) model is preferred by both dating sites and affiliates, but sometimes CPC (cost per click) can work as well. Increase your odds of success with affiliates by displaying deals from businesses relevant to the dating industry such as florists, jewelers or candy stores. If your dating site is niche, consider working with affiliates that cater to that niche.
In a past life, I worked on sketching and really enjoyed it. With this book, I now have great hopes of returning back to my calling. I purchased this book as it appeared compelling that one could actually make a living doing something they enjoyed. Vincent has hit upon a very hot topic nowadays in which people are hungry to turn their passions, desires and interests into streams of sustainable supplemental income. So many people are fed up with their boring dead end jobs and desperately seeking a way out. I believe this book is a great catalyst in making an investment in yourself and your future. 

These are great tips for established artists, but what I want to share here are some alternative artistic money-making ideas which might be more realistic options for someone just starting out down a creative career path. Some may seem obvious to you, and some you may already be doing, but I hope you can get at least one new idea for creating an extra source of income from your art.
This is pretty informational , but I do have some questions. I recently turned 18 and am about to graduate high school, but I attend a technology center as well. I have been using Adobe products such as Photoshop quite a bit and as of right now I just need to study and get my certification for Adobe Photoshop. I have a real interest in making neat edits on photos. I plan to attend the technology center next year as well and get more experience. While attending school would it be possible for me to get my work out there to clients and maybe even businesses so that I could get paid? How would I go about doing this exactly? How much would I charge? If you would like, you can take a look at my Bechance Portfolio or e-mail me and I could send you some of my logos I have made and pictures I have edited.
A site from the FriendFinder Network that is constantly one of the top converting web sites. Maybe you have a site that isn't outright "adult" in nature, but it's more provocative than the traditional "vanilla" dating sites? Passion.com has all the high-converting designs and functionality of AdultFriendFinder, but with considerable restraint in the nudity and language departments. With over 23 million satisfied members worldwide, this program has created significant wealth for many affiliates.
Zazzle has been so far the best money maker for me. I haven’t done much work lately with it either. other than adding new designs. I also make a little money, but not as much on Cafe Press. I had recently started with Spoonflower and been a bit impressed with sales. You make the less money with that one, 5% :( and plus you must ‘proof’ your design before selling. Meaning you much order it to see it personally. Yikes! Which really is a good idea, but who can order every single design first before selling! But I have less than 12 designs on there now and already have a nice #1 seller. Keeps me on the site and occasionally proofing the designs as I add more along the way

Johns’ system is a series of homemade notebooks. He carries one with him at all times so he can capture his ideas on paper whenever inspiration strikes. He says, “I might be in a lineup at a coffee shop, on the bus, watching TV, or putting the kids to sleep. I’ll overhear a conversation, see some quirky gig poster, spot an interesting pattern, or think of an odd combination of objects, and I’ll pull out a sketchbook and get the idea down on paper.”


Teaching and tutoring English as a second language is a great way to make money online, not to mention open some doors for you to travel the world if you'd like. While full ESL (English as a Second Language) accreditation is recommended, as long as you’re a native speaker and have the ability to teach, there are people in countries such as Hong Kong or the UAE who are willing to pay upwards of $25/hr for you to tutor them English via Skype. Check out Indeed, Learn4Good and Remote.co for remote english tutoring jobs or sign up on a specialized site like VerbalPlanet or Chegg Tutors.

For example, he is strategic with his time, and decided early on to make simple art that could be done in two hours or less. “It couldn’t be something like oil painting that needed set up time and weeks of time to complete one piece”, he says. “I wanted to feel a sense of accomplishment on a regular basis, even if I was only chipping away at it for 30 minutes a day.” And so he tailored his art accordingly – small accomplishments that could be produced quickly.
Starting a podcast, like making a YouTube channel or blog, comes down to telling interesting stories and building an engaged audience. I’m probably sounding like a broken record by now, but you need a niche that you’re interested in and there’s already a demand for. Come up with a list of topics you’d like to talk about and then search iTunes charts, Google Trends and other podcast research sites like cast.market to see what’s currently out there and popular. 

There is a way to build dating sites that avoids all of these problems, and it involves a company called Dating Factory (also known as Private Label Dating Provider.)  Dating Factory has a simple system that allows you to create your own private label, or “white label”, as it is sometimes known, dating sites in more than 40 different niches.  You’ll have access to custom graphics, ready-built site templates, easy-to-use WYSIWYG text editors and even promotional tools to help you get your dating sites known.  You can even set up your own affiliate program to recruit other people to promote your sites for you, putting you in a position to make money from other people’s promotional efforts.
Open your own online boutique where you can vend your hand-drawn portraits, greeting cards, posters and other items featuring your pictures. Some crafter websites charge no fees to set up your shop on its site, but will take a percentage of your sales in return for letting you sell. You get to set your own prices and add photos of your pictures so shoppers can browse before buying.
Affiliate Marketing: Use your dating service to recruit to other dating services, or any other appropiate product and service. You could use traditional affiliate networks, or you could arrange your own deals with any appropiate company. For example, you could team up with a florist and gift retailer and make a button on each profile that says: "Send me a gift or flower". There's probably thousands of different opportunities you could use to blend affiliate marketing with your dating site.
The problem is that if you decide that you’re going to promote a particular brand, such as EHarmony or Plenty of Fish, or Match, you’re going to find yourself having to compete with tens of thousands of other marketers.  Just do a search for any of those brands online and you’ll find that there are endless review sites, countless ads, and more promotional material than you can possibly imagine.  You’re also going to find yourself going up against some pretty well established competition.  Some of the people promoting those brands have been doing it for years, and they’re very good at it.  It’s unlikely that you’re going to start promoting EHarmony today and replace some of the big marketers who are ranking highly at the top of the search engines for that brand.  So what do you do?  How do you compete in promoting dating sites?
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